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Picture Books Celebrating Winter

Hi Kid Lit Friends,

I love picture books set in the winter that are unrelated to the holidays. There is something very beautiful about the quiet of winter, a time for hibernating and being cozy. Here are some of my favorite picture books set in the winter season.

Owl Moon by Jane Yolen, illustrated by John Schoenherr

This quiet book is set on a late winter night when a young girl and her father go looking for owls. The father makes an owl call, but there is no response. Wordlessly the two companions walk along, for when you go owling you don’t need words. You don’t need anything but hope. Sometimes there isn’t an owl, but sometimes there is.

Goodbye Autumn, Hello Winter by Kenard Pak

Siblings take a walk through their town, taking the time to observe the changes in the seasons and to greet the coming winter. This is part of a four picture book series from author-illustrator Kenard Pak who has a book for each season. I love reading these books as the weather changes!

Tracks in the Snow by Wong Herbert Yee

This charming picture book captures the joy of snow and exploration. A young girl heads out to explore to the new snow, following tracks that she does not know if her own. This book and its beautiful illustrations transport the reader to those quiet winter days.

Winter Dance by Marion Dane Bauer, illustrated by Richard Jones

At the first sign of snow, all the animals need to get ready by storing up food or migrating to warmer weather or growing a thicker coat. But fox is unsure what to do until he finds his friend who has the perfect idea to celebrate the snowfall.

The Shortest Day by Susan Cooper, illustrated by Carson Ellis

Oh how I love this book! Newbery Medal Winner Susan Cooper’s evocative poem is laid out in picture book form and beautifully illustrated by Caldecott Honor winter Carson Ellis. The words capture the magic behind the returning of the light, the yearning for traditions that connect us with generations that have gone before, and the hope for peace that we carry into the future. 


What are you reading these days? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*

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Books to Read for President’s Day

Hi, Kid Lit Friends!

I hope you are all enjoying the weekend, and hopefully some of you have President’s Day off from work!

There has been so much interest in Presidents and the Presidential office in the last year given the election, so I thought I would round up some great books, most of them released in the past couple of months (and one coming out next month!).

Exploring the White House by Kate Andersen Brower

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue is one of America’s most iconic buildings, but how much do you know about what goes on inside? Who helps keep this historic house running? This informative book covers everything from its Residence workers, first ladies, presidential pets, and even a couple of ghosts (!!!). The book also includes photos and fun facts.

Kamala Harris: Rooted in Justice by Nikki Grimes, illustrated by Laura Freeman

When Kamala was growing up in Oakland, California, her family marched for justice. And when Kamala went to school, she fought for the use of a soccer field in middle school. And after she graduated law school, she fought for the people in her home state of California in Congress. Now, Kamala uses her voice as the first woman to hold the office of Vice President of the United States. This stunning book tells Kamala’s story.

Champ and Major: First Dogs by Joy McCullough, illustrated by Sheyda Abvabi Best

This truly charming book follows the lives of Champ and Major, the first dogs of the United States of America. While Champ is used to the White House from his time there when his dad was the Vice President, Major was adopted afterwards and Champ has a lot to teach him! Watch how Major prepares Champ for his role as First Dog!

Michelle’s Garden: How the First Lady Planted Seeds of Change by Sharee Miller (Little, Brown, 3/2/21)

Former First Lady Michelle Obama wanted to grow the largest kitchen garden ever at the White House, but there was one problem. She had never gardened before. But every big project takes a village, so she enlisted help from local students, the White House staff, and even her husband, President Barack Obama. Her mission to inspire young people to adopt healthy eating habits continues now with her new Netflix show, Waffles + Mochi!

Joey: The Story of Joe Biden by Dr. Jill Biden, illustrated by Amy June Bates

Joe Biden grew up in Scranton, Pennsylvania, the oldest of four children. He struggled with a stutter growing up, so he read aloud every day to overcome it. When he moved to Wilmington, Delaware, he become one of the youngest state senators to ever be elected at age 29 and later become Vice President under President Barack Obama. Now, he is the current President of the United States!

Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters by Barack Obama, illustrated by Loren Long

This beautiful book is Barack Obama’s tribute to thirteen groundbreaking Americans who have inspired and shaped our nation. From the artistry of Georgia O’Keeffe, to the courage of Jackie Robinson, to the patriotism of George Washington, Obama sees the traits of these heroes within his own children, and within all of America’s children. Loren Long’s gorgeous illustrations bring the book to life!


What are you reading these days? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*

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Beautiful New Board Books!

Hi Kid Lit Friends,

One of my favorite things to do is select board book gifts for my friends who have just had babies. I just sent out a package to dear friends who recently adopted an infant. Here are the board books I selected for them!

Hello Hello by Brendan Wenzel

I love Brendan Wenzel’s striking art, which I think will draw the attention of the youngest readers. This board book edition contains the same gorgeous illustrations as the original picture book, introducing readers to the striped tiger and the spotted leopard and the lovely patterns found on tortoise shells and pangolin backs.

Cool Cuts by Mechal Renee Roe

This great board book has a lovely graphic illustration quality, showing Black hairstyles including a ‘fro-hawk, mini-twists, crisp cornrows, cool curls, waves, and afros. With every page, the words proclaim, “I am born to be awesome!” Can you think of a better sentence to be reading to a brand new human?

I Am! Affirmations for Resilience by Bela Barbosa, illustrated by Edel Rodriguez

This rainbow-filled board book has a wonderful message on every page. Ten relatable emotions are each followed by a centering exercise and a positive affirmation to be recited, as a practice in mindfulness. Young readers are encouraged to find their inner strength by recognizing and addressing their emotions, instilling a sense of power and self-confidence.

Richard Scarry’s Busy Busy People by Richard Scarry

When I was young, I loved examining each page of Richard Scarry’s wonderful books. There is so much to take in, and I love Scarry’s humorous drawings and how he conveys a sense of motion and movement. Little ones are sure to love this durable board book version of his busy people series.

TouchThinkLearn: Build! by Xavier Deneux

This inventive board book gives young readers much to touch and explore with kid-safe puzzle-like play pieces and bold shapes and colors.


What are you reading these days? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*

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The ALA Youth Media Award Winners!

Hi Kid Lit Friends!

Oh my goodness, last Monday was WILD! It was the day of the American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards, and I was having heart palpitations at seeing so many of my favorite books published in 2020 getting awards! And not to pat myself on the back, but a lot of the books I recommended last year were given awards. I’m feeling quite satisfied with myself! 🙂

Let’s take a look at some of the winners!

All Thirteen by Christina Soontornvat

Okay, first off can we just recognize that the incredible Christina Soontornvat got not just one Newbery Honor, but TWO! You probably got very tired of me talking last year about how much I loved A Wish in the Dark and All Thirteen. You know when you get that feeling when you open a book and read the first paragraph and know that you’re going to love it? That’s exactly how I felt about those two books, and I could not be happier for Christina! (Disclaimer: We are friends and yes, she is the nicest person!)

We Are Water Protectors by Carole Lindstrom, illustrated by Michaela Goade

I loved this book way back in 2019, months before it was published. I knew it was special from the very beginning. Michaela Goade’s luminescent illustrations are a sight to behold. I could not be more thrilled that she won the Caldecott!

When You Trap A Tiger by Tae Keller

This gorgeous book was released in January 2020, so readers had an entire year to fall in love with it! It was awarded the Newbery Medal and is a gorgeous story based on Korean folklore. A young girl goes on a quest to unlock the power of stories and save her grandmother, and along the way she learns more about her family history and her own strength. Hooray, Tae!

Before the Ever After by Jacqueline Woodson

Jacqueline Woodson does it again with a middle grade novel in verse about a young boy and his father, a professional football player who is suffering from the many concussions he sustained over the course of his career. I read this book in one sitting, and I cannot recommend it enough. This book was awarded the Coretta Scott King Author Award!

¡Vamos! Let’s Go Eat by Raúl the Third

I am so thrilled that the ¡Vamos! books are going to be a big long series because they are so fun and full of incredible illustrations and colors. Let’s Go Eat is the second book in the series, with more to come! Peppered with easy-to-remember Latin-American Spanish vocabulary, this glorious celebration of food is sure to leave every reader hungry for lunch!


There were so many incredible books that were given awards – check the full list on the American Library Association website. There were a few other books that I absolutely loved that didn’t get awards, but I cannot wait to see more from those authors and illustrators in the future! Whew, what will 2021 bring? I can’t wait to see!

What books were you excited to see win awards? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

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5 Picture Books I’m Looking Forward to in 2021!

Hi Kid Lit Friends,

Last week I wrote about some middle grade books that I’m excited about for the first few months of 2021, and here are some picture books to put on your list!

Lala’s Words by Gracey Zhang (Scholastic, April 6, 2021)

The first thing I thought about when I opened this book was that the city illustrations reminded me so much of Bernard Waber, the author/illustrator of Lyle, Lyle Crocodile. In Lala’s Words, Lala keeps running off to her special place where she compliments and encourages the plants growing in a neglected plot in the middle of a city block. The plants thrive on her words and in return give a gift to the neighborhood.

The Old Boat by Jarrett Pumphrey, illustrated by Jerome Pumphrey (Norton Young Readers, March 2, 2021)

I was enchanted by The Old Truck, the debut picture book from this talented brother duo that released last year. As a result, I am very excited about this new collaboration, which follows a young boy and his grandmother who set sail on their fishing boat each day. Time goes by, and the boy grows up and has to venture farther to sea as the waters around his island grow more polluted. Can he help clean up the waters to provide a more beautiful home for his new family?

The Little Blue Bridge by Brenda Maier, illustrated by Sonia Sánchez (Scholastic Press, April 6, 2021)

This sweet book follows four siblings who are trying to cross the river to pick blueberries for a pie. Unfortunately, the only bridge is blocked by the neighborhood bully, Santiago, who demands snacks. Each sibling crosses the bridge by promising that the next sibling has better snacks, until Ruby refuses to be bullied. Instead, she comes up with her own solution. I loved the vibrant illustrations in this book which is sure to be a read aloud hit.

Eyes That Kiss in the Corners by Joanna Ho, illustrated by Dung Ho (HarperCollins, January 5, 2021)

This sweet picture book celebrates the shape of Asian eyes. When a young Asian girl notices that the shape of her eyes are different from her friend’s eyes, she reflects on how her eyes are similar to her Mama’s and Amah’s and Mei-Mei’s. Her eyes “crinkle into crescent moons and sparkle like the stars”.

The Ramble Shamble Children by Christina Soontornvat, illustrated by Lauren Castillo (Nancy Paulsen Books, March 9, 2021)

Five kids live in a ramble shamble house, working hard to take care of the garden and the chickens. When they come across a picture of a “proper house”, they wonder if their home is good enough. Charming illustrations by Caldecott Honor Winner Lauren Castillo perfectly capture Christina Soontornvat’s heartwarming story set high up in the mountains.


What are you reading these days? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*

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5 Middle Grade Books I’m Looking Forward to in 2021

Hi Kid Lit Friends,

Well, 2021 had already been quite a whirlwind. While so much seems uncertain about the future, what we can all be sure of is that writers are continuing to pour their hearts into their books. Here are five middle grade books I’m looking forward to in the first few months of 2021. There are some lovely titles to put on your TBR list!

Merci Suárez Can’t Dance by Meg Medina (Candlewick, April 6, 2021)

I loved Merci Suárez Changes Gears (the winner of the Newbery Award!) and I loved Merci Suárez Can’t Dance. In this companion novel, Merci faces seventh grade, dealing with new teachers, new responsibilities, and battling with classmate Edna Santos who is in charge of the annual Heart Ball. More than anything, Merci wants to talk to her grandfather Lolo about what’s happening, but his Alzheimer’s is getting worse every day. This is a heartwarming book about a beautiful family and a young girl trying to make sense of middle grade. (Check out Meg Medina in her Author Fan Face-Off challenge!)

Bump by Matt Wallace (Katherine Tegen Books, January 26, 2021)

I was completely charmed by this middle grade book by Matt Wallace, a former professional wrestler and self-defense instructor. This book is the story of a young girl, MJ, who is abandoned by her father and turns to the world of professional wrestling for comfort. When MJ learns that her neighbor runs a wrestling school, she has a new focus. She wants to join the school, train hard, and become a wrestler. But her dreams are threatened when her coach’s rival wants to close the wrestling school.

Ground Zero: A Novel of 9/11 by Alan Gratz (Scholastic, February 2, 2021)

In characteristic Alan Gratz fashion, this high-paced historical novel has two points of view and is set in vastly different parts of the world. In New York City, Brandon is visiting his father at work on the 107th floor of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Meanwhile, two years earlier, Reshmina is growing up in Afghanistan in the shadow of war. This compelling and page turning novel is another incredible book from a master of historical fiction.

Strong as Fire, Fierce As Flame by Supriya Kelkar (Lee and Low Books, February 24, 2021)

First of all, this cover! 😍 This book follows 12-year-old Meera in 1857 India where her future has been planned since she was a young child when her parents married her to a boy from a neighboring village. Right before she turns 13, she prepares to leave her family to live with her husband in accordance with her religion. But when Indian soldiers mutiny against their British commanders, her husband is killed in the ensuing riots. The dictates of her religion require Meera to end her life by throwing herself on her husband’s funeral pyre. She runs away and finds refuge as a servant in the house of a high-ranking British East India Company captain, giving her an opportunity to serve her country in an unimaginable way.

Legacy: Women Poets of the Harlem Renaissance by Nikki Grimes (Bloomsbury, January 5, 2021)

I loved One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance, a companion book that came out a few years ago. Legacy follows the same format with original works by poets followed by Nikki Grimes’ use of “The Golden Shovel” poetic method to create wholly original poems based on the works of these groundbreaking women-and to introduce readers to their work. The artwork is truly stunning in this book, created by dozens of incredibly talented illustrators such as Vashti Harrison, Ekua Holmes, and Cozbi A. Cabrera.


What are you reading these days? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*

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Children’s Books With Quilting Themes

Hi Kid Lit Friends,

As some of you know, I love to quilt and have been quilting for nearly 20 years. I’ve made dozens of quilts over the years for friends’ babies and for my own family. Because the pandemic kept me inside last year, I finished two large quilts in 2020 and am a few days away from finishing another one.

Quilt in progress in January 2020
Finished quilt in September of 2020

There are many picture books with quilting themes, so I thought I would share some favorites!

The Arabic Quilt: An Immigrant Story by Aya Khalil, illustrated by Anait Semirdzhyan

When Kanzi moves from Egypt to America, all she wants to do is fit in. But when mom arrives at her school with her forgotten lunch, her classmates notice how different her mom dresses and talks. The teasing begins, and Kanzi returns home and wraps herself in the quilt her grandmother gave her and writes a poem about the quilt in Arabic. Her teachers sees the poem and begins a class project the next day that involves creating a paper quilt of student names in Arabic. This is a sweet, beautiful book about belonging, acceptance, and sharing our different cultures.

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by James Ransome

This incredible book tells the story of Clara, a slave and seamstress on Home Plantation, who overhears plans about the Underground Railroad. Wanting to help those dreaming of freedom, she uses her quilt making skills along with scraps of fabric she finds from working in the Big House to create a map for the Underground Railroad.

The Quilts of Gee’s Bend by Susan Goldman Rubin

For nearly 200 years, African American women living in the rural community of Gee’s Bend have been making quilts. Using fabric from old overalls, aprons, bleached cornmeal sacks, and other scraps, they have created magnificent pieces of art. Their quilting tradition has been passed down from generation to generation, and the stunning quilts have ended up displayed at renowned museums. This book includes full color photographs of some of the quilts as well as interviews with the Gee’s Bend community.

Stitchin’ and Pullin’ by Patricia McKissack, illustrated by Cozbi A. Cabrera

This is another picture book about Gee’s Bend, only this one is gorgeously illustrated by Cozbi A. Cabrera (one of my favorite illustrators!). Author Patricia McKissack visited Gee’s Bend, Alabama, to collect stories about these quilts, and wrote poems to celebrate the familial, cultural, spiritual, and historical strands of life in this community.

The All-Together Quilt by Lizzy Rockwell

Author Lizzy Rockwell is the founder and director of the cooperative community quilting group Peace by Piece: The Norwalk Community Quilt Project. In this picture book, she speaks to some of her experiences doing a multi-generational quilting project, from gathering people together, selecting colorful pieces of fabric for each square, and creating a handprint border. This is a lovely story of community coming together to make art!


What are you reading these days? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*

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Empowering Picture Books

Dear Kid Lit friends,

Hello from 2021! I hope you all had a lovely holiday season and new year. In the spirit of new beginnings, I thought I would round up some beautiful picture books with empowering messages!

I Am Enough by Grace Byers, illustrated by Keturah A. Bobo

This gorgeous picture book is a story of empowerment and affirmations written by actress and activist Grace Byers. As a biracial CODA (Child Of Deaf Adults), Grace was bullied throughout her childhood. This led her to write her first picture book to empower young girls to believing in themselves and being kind to others. I love the illustrations in this book!

I Am Every Good Thing by Derrick Barnes and Gordon C. James

From the duo that brought us Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut, I Am Every Good Thing is about a confident Black narrator who is proud of himself and loves who he is. He deals with frustrations by never giving up and is adventurous, funny, and has big dreams. A must have book for every child (and adult!).

Dear Girl: A Celebration of Wonderful, Smart, Beautiful You! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Paris Rosenthal, illustrated by Holly Hatam

This book makes me cry every time I read it. The story is all about reminding readers to honor themselves and their emotions, empowering girls to be strong, courageous, and bold. And if this book doesn’t make you cry, read this article written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, You May Want to Marry My Husband, published in the New York Times on March 5, 2017.

All Because You Matter by Tami Charles, illustrated by Bryan Collier

I am a fan of every picture book that Bryan Collier illustrates, and All Because You Matter is no exception. The powerful words affirm to children everywhere that they matter in every stage of life, from their birth to first steps to growing up and becoming a teenager. Even in the midst of current events and the tragedies in our history, this book tells us that we matter in this moment.

Babymoon by Hayley Barrett, illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal

In this lush book, a couple celebrates the arrival fo their baby. Before the world meets the new one, the family is on their babymoon, oohing and aahing over the newborn’s features and learning new things about this baby as they become a family. This is a lovely book to share with young readers to remind them of the joy at their arrival into the world.


What are you reading these days? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*

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Marvelous Middle Grade Books for Gift Giving

Hi Kid Lit Friends,

The final newsletter of 2020 features my favorite middle grade books from this year! I’ve already shared many favorite books published this year, and I’m so grateful to have been able to read so many children’s books. Here are my favorite middle grade books, perfect for readers ages eight to twelve.

  • As American as Paneer Pie by Supriya Kelkar: Indian American Lekha Divekar is excited to welcome a new neighbor until she realizes that Avantika is new to the country, not like Lekha at all.
  • Wink by Rob Harrell: Ross Maloy receives a recent diagnosis of a rare eye cancer.
  • All Thirteen by Christina Soontornvat: The incredible story of the cave rescue of a Thai boys soccer team.
  • Any Day With You by Mae Respicio: Kaia learns that her beloved grandfather Tatang is moving back to the Philippines.
  • Before the Ever After by Jacqueline Woodson: ZJ’s father suffers from head injuries after years as a professional football player.
  • City Spies by James Ponti: Sara Martinez joins a group of young spies to save the world.
  • Fighting Words by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley: Ten-year-old Della and her sister Suki enter the foster care system and confront past abuse.
  • Go With The Flow by Karen Schneemann and Lily Williams: Four high school sophomores petition their school administration to support female health in this graphic novel.
  • Land of Cranes by Aida Salazar: Nine-year-old Betita holds onto hope while living at a detention center for migrants and refugees.
  • On the Horizon by Lois Lowry, illustrated by Kenard Pak: Interwoven stories told in verse based on Lowry’s childhood living in Hawaii and Japan during World War II.
  • Prairie Lotus by Linda Sue Park: Hanna, a young half-Asian girl, grows up in America’s heartland in 1880 and confronts her community’s prejudice against Asians.
  • The Radium Girls: Young Readers Edition by Kate Moore: The true story of young women who took jobs painting watch dials with glow-in-the-dark radium paint.
  • Shirley and Jamila Save Their Summer by Gillian Goerz: New friends Shirley and Jamila start a detective agency.
  • When Stars Are Scattered by Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed: A National Book Award Finalist based on Omar Mohamed’s life growing up in a refugee camp in Kenya.
  • A High Five for Glenn Burke by Phil Bildner: Sixth grader Silas Wade does a presentation on former Major Leaguer Glenn Burke, a gay baseball player in the 1970s, the first step in revealing a big part of who Silas is.
  • Class Act by Jerry Craft: The companion book to the Newbery Award winning book New Kid.
  • Black Brother, Black Brother by Jewell Parker Rhodes: A powerful book about two brothers, one who presents as white and the other who presents as Black, as they prepare for a fencing competition.
  • The Canyon’s Edge by Dusti Bowling: Nora and her father look for peace in a canyon deep in the Arizona desert when a flash flood carries Nora’s dad and all their supplies away.
  • Echo Mountain by Lauren Wolk: The Great Depression forces Ellie and her family to move to Echo Mountain where her father suffers a head injury that leaves him in a coma.
  • From the Desk of Zoe Washington by Janae Marks: Twelve-year-old Zoe is determined to uncover the truth to her father’s conviction.
  • King and the Dragonflies by Kacen Callender: When Kingston James’s brother passes away, Kingston is convinced that his brother is now a dragonfly. A National Book Award winner!
  • The List of Things That Will Not Change by Rebecca Stead: Bea keeps a list of things that will not change, which gives her hope during a time of lots of change.
  • Maya and the Rising Dark by Rena Barron: Twelve-year-old Maya ventures out to search for her lost father in this contemporary fantasy.
  • The Prettiest by Brigit Young: A ranked list appears online of the fifty prettiest girls in the eighth grade, and three girls join forces to stand up for each other.
  • Twins by Varian Johnson: Twins Maureen and Francine begin to drift apart in sixth grade in this graphic novel.
  • Stand Up, Yumi Chung! by Jessica Kim: Yumi Chung leads a double life by secretly enrolling in a comedy class when her mom thinks she’s in test-prep tutoring.
  • When You Trap a Tiger by Tae Keller: A young girl embarks on a quest to save her grandmother in this novel based on Korean folklore.
  • Spy School Revolution by Stuart Gibbs: Ben Ripley faces a new evil organization.
  • The Last Kids on Earth and the Skeleton Road by Max Brallier: Jack, June, Quint, and Dirk embark on an epic road trip to stop evil in the sixth book in The Last Kids on Earth series.
  • Cleo Porter and the Body Electric by Jake Burt: A girl lives in isolation with her parents following a catastrophic pandemic (sound familiar???).
  • Chirp by Kate Messner: Mia moves to Vermont the summer after seventh grade, recovering from a gymnastics injury and finding refuge and healing near her Gram.
  • Which Lane? by Torrey Maldonado: A coming-of-age story set in New York City with Black Lives Matter themes.

Wishing all of you a very happy holiday season and a bright start to 2021! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until 2021!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*

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Charming Chapter Books and Early Readers for Gift Giving

Every December, I love looking back at the year in books. Each year brings so many wonderful additions to children’s literature, and it is my honor to look at the books coming out every year and select my favorites. Last week I selected 18 of my favorite picture books from 2020, and this week is chapter books and early readers! These are books for burgeoning and newly independent readers (so fun!). Stay tuned, because next week is middle grade books…

  • Arlo and Pips: King of the Birds by Elise Gravel: A delightful new early graphic novel series featuring an arrogant crow and a little bird.
  • Narwhal’s Otter Friend by Ben Clanton: The fourth book in this adorable graphic novel series features a new friend, adventurous Otty the Otter!
  • Barkus: Dog Dreams by Patricia MacLachlan, illustrated by Marc Boutavant: Barkus has a stomachache in the second book of this exuberant early chapter book series.
  • Geeger the Robot Goes to School by Jarrett Lerner, illustrated by Serge Seidlitz: Geegor the Robot goes to school among humans and learns many things about people.
  • Stella Diaz Dreams Big by Angela Dominguez: Stella is having a great year in fourth grade, but has she gotten in over her head with all the activities she has committed to?

What are you reading these days? Let me know! Find me on Twitter at @KarinaYanGlaser, on Instagram at @KarinaIsReadingAndWriting, or email me at KarinaBookRiot@gmail.com.

Until next time!
Karina

*If this e-mail was forwarded to you, follow this link to subscribe to “The Kids Are All Right” newsletter and other fabulous Book Riot newsletters for your own customized e-mail delivery. Thank you!*