Categories
True Story

New Releases: Real Housewives and DDT

I don’t know about you, but I just finished my fifth Lincoln audiobook and I am not much closer to figuring out that man. So COMPLicated. House of Abraham by Stephen Berry was better than I expected, and Berry writes with an actual personality, which I always appreciate in nonfiction. It’s all about Lincoln’s relationship with the Todd (his wife Mary’s) family.

What I DIDN’T like was H.W. Brands’s The Zealot and the Emancipator, which was a kind of dual biography themed on abolition about John Brown and Lincoln. Brands was much, much more favorable to Brown, which is a Take.

Ok! New nonfiction for this week:

How to Sell a Poison cover

How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT by Elena Conis

DDT! Originally it was meant to save lives during WWII by killing the insects that spread disease. When its harmful effects were widely publicized by Rachel Carson and others, it was banned in 1972. Now it seems to be back? Conis tells the story of this harmful 20th century chemical in her book with its excellent, excellent cover.

Sisters of Mokama

Sisters of Mokama: The Pioneering Women Who Brought Hope and Healing to India by Jyoti Thottam

New York Times Opinion editor Thottam tells the story of six Kentucky nuns who traveled to India in 1947 and built a hospital in Bihar, “an impoverished and isolated state in northern India that had been one of the bloodiest regions of Partition.” Thottam’s mother was trained by these women to become a nurse in the 1960s. This is the story of the women whose lives were changed by Nazareth Hospital.

Quake Chasers

Quake Chasers: 15 Women Rocking Earthquake Science by Lori Polydoros

This is so specific that I love it? Like, wow, they find 15 diverse women scientists who study earthquakes. This is just under 200 pages and for ages 12 and up (excellent). Check out stories like: “Dr. Debbie Weiser travels to communities post-disaster, such as Japan and China, to evaluate earthquake damage in ways that might help save lives during the next Big One. Geologist Edith Carolina Rojas climbs to the top of volcanoes or searches barren deserts for volcanic evidence to measure seismic activity. Geophysicist Lori Dengler works with governments to provide guidance and protection against future tsunamis.” We frequently talk on For Real about how there is someone who is interested in everything, and this not only highlights that super cool fact, but also shows young people potential careers in earthquake science. Hurray!

Love Me As I Am cover

Love Me As I Am by Garcelle Beauvais

Apparently this person is on Real Housewives of Beverly Hills and costar Erika Jayne (who is someone?) threw Beauvais’s book in the trash, which, if you do this on a reality show, might actually be a kind friendship thing to do since it results in book publicity like the above. Apparently her book is about being born in Haiti, immigrating to Boston, and eventually embarking on an acting career that included NYPD Blue (the ’90s!) and, now, “RHOBH.” This seems very fun if you watch this franchise! I asked my two friends who do to describe her and they said “icon” and “she’s perfect and probably too good and smart for the Real Housewives machine, but I’m thankful she’s a part of it.”

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: The Atom and Bengali Food

My journey among the many many books about Abraham Lincoln continues. I am still wandering in the land of audiobooks, which is great, because then I can do my coloring app while I listen.

Welcome to April, by the way! I hope it is better for you than the endless slog that is March. At least there are books. Also TV. So many options.

You Are More Than Magic

You Are More Than Magic: The Black and Brown Girls’ Guide to Finding Your Voice by Minda Harts

Teen nonfiction! Harts is an NYU professor and founder of The Memo, a career development company for women of color. In her book for teen women of color, she shares advice and anecdotes for finding your voice and making it be heard. It is “all about finding your own unique path to success—at school, at work, at home, and beyond.”

Khabaar cover

Khabaar: An Immigrant Journey of Food, Memory, and Family by Madhushree Ghosh

A food memoir! People love food memoirs, and rightly so, because they are great. This in particular talks about South Asian food (the author “keeps her parents’ memory alive through her Bengali food”) and the role food plays in the immigrant’s journey to their new home.

The Woman Who Split the Atom cover

The Woman Who Split the Atom: The Life of Lise Meitner by Marissa Moss

Meitner was a German Jewish scientist who discovered nuclear fission! Yep, she found out how to split the atom. Was her male lab partner rewarded by the Nobel committee? Yes. Was she? Of course not. This falls under the Abrams Young Readers imprint and features illustrations that explain Meitner’s life, work, and pacifism in the face of the use of her work for the atomic bomb.

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Explorers and Ancestors

I was just in New York City, where I went to The Strand, a bookstore I usually do not like due to its immense crowds and narrow aisles. These frequently preclude browsing. But it was relatively uncrowded this time and I had a lovely time! They have a bunch of Lincoln books too, so I got some. I will solve the enigma that is Abraham Lincoln. Take that, decades of historians.

Got some new releases for you!

Straits cover

Straits: Beyond the Myth of Magellan by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto

If your school was like my school, you had to memorize a bunch of sixteenth century explorers and where they went and absolutely nothing about the consequences of their actions. Enter Ferdinand Magellan! The publisher describes this as “a study in failure” and says that Magellan was “focused less on circumnavigating the world or cornering the global spice market than on exploiting Filipino gold.” If you want to find out the researched truth about one of the famed explorers, check this out.

Ancestor Trouble

Ancestor Trouble: A Reckoning and a Reconciliation by Maud Newton

Newton’s ancestors demonstrate what can at the least be called a colorful history. In this delve into hereditary traits, genetics, and more, she looks into how much we might be influenced by those who came before us, how intergenerational trauma might come into play, and “modernity’s dismissal of ancestors.” Which is legit! This is Newton’s first book and it looks fascinating.

All the White Friends cover

All the White Friends I Couldn’t Keep: Hope–and Hard Pills to Swallow–About Fighting for Black Lives by Andre Henry

Musician and writer Henry shares how he became an activist and how he was inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement. As the subtitle might suggest, Henry discovered that many white friends and colleagues “were more interested in debating whether racism existed or whether Henry was being polite enough in the way he used his voice.” His work now is focused on social justice and nonviolent social change.

Truth in Our Stories cover

The Truth in Our Stories: Immigrant Voices in Radical Times by Mónica Tornoe, Elizabeth Wright, Jesus Jesse Esparza

I love a collection, and this one shares twelve stories highlighting parts of the immigrant experience, including exploitation by employers, a frequent inability to get a driver’s license, difficulty obtaining healthcare, among other issues.

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Week of March 20

You know when you go to a new bookstore and it’s amazing and you’re like WOW this city is really worth coming back to? This happened to me in Austin (BookPeople!!) and then last weekend, I was in the Twin Cities and wow. Wow. So many bookstores. I had no idea, despite like 40% of people I know living in the Twin Cities (including Kim from this newsletter and For Real!).

I texted Kim and asked her which she’d recommend the most and one she and others recommended was Magers & Quinn. It’s really big AND really windy, so you get to wander around aisles. But organized aisles. And it has used and new books, so I got a copy of Simon Schama’s 1989 history of the French Revolution for like $4. My wife and I bought five books each, and I didn’t even look at the FICTION section. Like a whole major section unexamined. That is for next time!

Anyway, new nonfiction for this week!:

Burning My Roti

Burning My Roti: Breaking Barriers as a Queer Indian Woman by Sharan Dhaliwal

Burnt Roti is the UK’s leading South Asian magazine, which talks about mental health and sexuality as they impact young creatives (among other things). Dhaliwal’s book of the same name is part-memoir and part discussion of topics like body hair, colorism, “and a particular focus on the suffocating beauty standards South Asian women are expected to adhere to.” I’m really feeling this almost ’70s color palate/illustration on the cover!

The Trayvon Generation

The Trayvon Generation: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow by Elizabeth Alexander

In June 2020, poet Alexander wrote an essay in The New Yorker entitled “The Trayvon Generation,” which “incisively and lovingly observed the experiences, attitudes, and cultural expressions of what she referred to as the Trayvon Generation, who even as children could not be shielded from the brutality that has affected the lives of so many Black people.” This expands her original essay into book form and is definitely worth picking up not only for its subject matter, but because nonfiction by poets tends to be amazing.

Truly Madly cover

Truly, Madly: Vivien Leigh, Laurence Olivier, and the Romance of the Century by Stephen Galloway

This cover!! Ok, this is a massive biography of a romance — the romance of Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier. They were married from 1940 to 1960, starred in films and plays together, and finally divorced, at least in part due to Leigh’s struggles with her mental illness. Wikipedia cites this as bipolar disorder, but I want to read the book before saying this is definitely true. Leigh died of tuberculosis at age 53. If you have not seen them in That Hamilton Woman, you should! They are a Golden Age of Hollywood power couple that I’ve loved since I was a teenager. Hurray for the Oliviers.

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Ancient Rome + Buffy

I have no memory of if I mentioned this last week, but I have been really into Abraham Lincoln. I finished Team of Rivals, which was excellent, and then I’ve been going through my library’s Lincoln-themed audiobooks. Only they don’t have enough! Not enough Lincoln! What a mystery of a person! Depths that can only be plumbed by taking in book after book.

Anyway, so that’s how my March has been going. I’ve also been reading a lot of Chinese or Chinese American sci-fi/fantasy? I have no idea why. But it is GREAT. So if you got any recs for that that aren’t Cixin Liu or Ken Liu, @ me on Twitter.

Here are the new releases!:

The War That Made the Roman Empire cover

The War That Made the Roman Empire: Antony, Cleopatra, and Octavian at Actium by Barry Strauss

This all about the Battle of Actium! After Caesar was assassinated, Antony and Cleopatra got involved and Egypt battled with Rome. Hundreds of ships fought! This battle determined who would rule the Roman Empire, and ended in the deaths of Antony and Cleopatra. Ancient world drama, right here.

Crossing Borders cover

Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants by Ali Noorani

Noorani is the executive director of the National Immigration Forum, an immigrant advocacy group that works for increased immigration and acceptance of refugees. In his newest book, he focuses on Honduras, Mexico, and Texas, focusing on why immigration happens and how we can be more compassionate.

Into Every Generation cover

Into Every Generation a Slayer is Born: How Buffy Staked Our Hearts by Evan Ross Katz

Ok here’s a confession: I’ve only seen two seasons of Buffy. But I know people love it! So here’s a book about it. This is all about the history and cultural impact of a show my coolest professors were all really into. Katz interviews the cast, creators, and crew and talks about his own time in the Buffy fandom. Hurray, TV history!

Sex Lives of African Women cover

The Sex Lives of African Women: Self-Discovery, Freedom, and Healing by Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah

Based on Sekyiamah’s blog of over ten years, she interviews African women around the world about sex. This includes talking to members of a queer community in Egypt, what it’s like to be polyamorous in Senegal, and chatting with “a pansexual Canadian of Malawian heritage.” The women range from ages 21 to 71 and are from thirty-one countries. Super cool.

Girls on Film cover

Girls on Film: Lessons From a Life of Watching Women in Movies by Alicia Malone

You may recognize Alicia Malone from her hosting work on FilmStruck. Here she examines the representation and impact of women on film. Each chapter “looks at a female character representative of a stereotype or trope,” which is awesome and very helpful for people like me. I’m still using the phrase “Smurfette principle,” because it easily illustrates an issue. Hoping for more like that from this book!

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Balloonmania and Environmentalism

So, how ’bout them books?

I just finished Team of Rivals and MAN. Already missing Doris Kearns Goodwin, y’know? Also just having hours and hours of information about Lincoln and his cabinet in my brain every week. So I’ve started another Lincoln book! The Lincoln Conspiracy by DC Comics writer Brad Meltzer. In case it wasn’t clear, this book is very different than Goodwin’s.

I hope you’re experiencing your own fun Team of Rivals moments! Maybe some of these new releases will provide them; let’s see:

Lady Icarus cover

Lady Icarus: Balloonmania and the Brief, Bold Life of Sophie Blanchard by Deborah Haynes

Can you imagine seeing a crowd of people in a field and you ask an excited woman passing by what’s up and she says “it’s a mania! Balloonmania!” Sophie Blanchard was a French balloonist in the early nineteenth century who, you might not be surprised, died in a balloon accident. Learn more of her tale here!

Unbossed cover

Unbossed: How Black Girls Are Leading the Way by Khristi Lauren Adams

Adams’s book profiles eight young Black women who are “leading, organizing, advocating, and creating.” These include Ssanyu Lukoma, who founded Brown Kids Read when she was thirteen years old and Hannah Lucas, a teenager who co-created a mental health app. What a balance to strike today between praising Gen Z for their excellent work and not making them feel like the weight of the future is on their shoulders! But I do love when we praise them. They are dealing with a lot.

Red Paint cover

Red Paint: The Ancestral Autobiography of a Coast Salish Punk by Sasha LaPointe

Coast Salish is “a group of ethnically and linguistically related Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast, living in British Columbia, Canada and the U.S. states of Washington and Oregon.” Sasha taqʷšəblu LaPointe blends her Coast Salish heritage with her love of punk culture in her autobiography. LaPointe’s great-grandmother helped preserve the Indigenous language Lushootseed, which is super cool.

The Intersectional Environmentalist cover

The Intersectional Environmentalist: How to Dismantle Systems of Oppression to Protect People + Planet by Leah Thomas

Omg yeeeess give me this weird 1970s throwback cover! Thomas highlights the links between environmentalism, racism, and privilege, and how we cannot achieve real environmental progress “without uplifting the voices of its people — especially those most often unheard.” I can’t get over this cover. But also this message is important! Thomas founded the Intersectional Environmentalist platform, a “climate justice community and resource hub centering BIPOC and historically under-amplified voices in the environmental space.” Amazing.

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Appalachia and NYC History

Happy reading to you! I hope in the midst of this world of chaos, you are just letting your reading go with the flow and not putting any undue pressure on it, because things are hard enough, y’know? Also, I’m all about that DNFing now. Have you read Danika Ellis’s I’m Breaking Up With 3-Star Reads? I was a big fan, despite not being able to go quite that far yet (it is a process).

There are so many books out there and maybe we should lean into the ones that really make us think or that we really enjoy, and not spend on our times on just okay ones. Something to think about! Maybe some of these new releases will be your 4 or 5 star reads:

Another Appalachia cover

Another Appalachia: Coming Up Queer and Indian in a Mountain Place by Neema Avashia

Avashia is a teacher and writer who grew up in West Virginia and identifies as a queer, Desi, Appalachian woman. She expands the stereotypical notions of Appalachia to show its true complexity, while exploring its “foodways, religion, sports, standards of beauty, social media, gun culture, and more.”

A Block in time cover

A Block in Time: A New York City History at the Corner of Fifth Avenue and Twenty-Third Street by Christiane Bird

Author Bird looks at one particular block in New York City and tells its history, from the time of the Lenape, through Dutch colonization, the nineteenth century (including the Gilded Age — how relevant!), to the twentieth. This covers theaters, factories, gambling dens, and colorful characters of the time.

What My Bones Know

What My Bones Know: A Memoir of Healing from Complex Trauma by Stephanie Foo

Journalist and producer on This American Life, Foo looks at complex PTSD (C-PTSD) and how it has impacted her life. She travels to her hometown in California and examines the impact of immigrant, as well as inherited, trauma. Be aware that this book discusses physical and emotional parental abuse.

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: True Crime and Medieval Queens

Hello! I’m sitting here with a passed-out cat and reflecting on how I am reading too many books right now, but also how this week’s nonfiction releases make me want to add even more to the list. It’s both not fair and really great. Keep those books comin’, authors!

Make sure to get your own Read Harder Book Journal from Book Riot to track your reading for the year!

Scoundrel by Sarah Weinman

Scoundrel: How a Convicted Murderer Persuaded the Women Who Loved Him, the Conservative Establishment, and the Courts to Set Him Free by Sarah Weinman

Weinman, author of The Real Lolita, which was very good, returns for another true crime book. This is about Edgar Smith, a man who in the ’60s was put on death row for murder. National Review founder William F. Buckley championed his cause, eventually resulting in Smith’s release, and then — yep, he tried to murder someone else. The whole story is here in Weinman’s book, so check out how on earth this happened.

Lifting Every Voice cover

Lifting Every Voice: My Journey from Segregated Roanoke to the Corridors of Power by William B. Robertson

Robertson tells his story as the first Black man to run for the Virginia General Assembly, his work to integrate a white school, and his support of the Black Lives Matter movement in his eighties. Robertson passed away in 2021, and the University of Virginia Press is publishing his memoir.

The Dark Queens cover

The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry that Forged the Medieval World by Shelley Puhak

Is Shelley Puhak a historian? No! She is a poet and a professor of creative writing. BUT. This is a really fun story about a time popular culture never talks about — sixth century Merovingian France! I’m talking about Brunhild, I’m talking about Fredegund, I’m talking about Chilperic unfortunately (Chilperic sucks). It’s a really fascinating time in history and I totes recommend this.

Education Across Borders cover

Education Across Borders: Immigration, Race, and Identity in the Classroom by Patrick Sylvain, Jalene Tamerat, Marie Lily Cerat

Are you a teacher? Do you teach BIPOC students? This is a resource for K-12 educators serving BIPOC and/or first-generation students that’s all about inclusive pedagogy. The three teachers who contributed “draw on their experiences as immigrants and educators to address racial inequity in the classroom.” Teachers are amazing, and this book can maybe help them be even more amazing. Hurray!

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Olympians, Con Artists, and the Color Blue

Did anyone see that pic of Sarah Jessica Parker reading during the Super Bowl, because I don’t even know if that was from this year, but it was v relatable. Why are the Bengals called the Bengals? Actually, I assumed the answer was “because tigers are cool” and it turns out it’s actually because the Cincinnati Zoo had a white Bengal tiger. So that’s neat. I mean, not for the tiger; it probably wanted to be in India. But I’m glad the name wasn’t just chosen out of nothing.

Make sure to get your own Read Harder Book Journal from Book Riot to track your reading for the year!

We got new books! Here we go:

Blue Cover

Blue: A History of the Color as Deep as the Sea and as Wide as the Sky by Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond, Daniel Minter (Illustrated by)

It’s a nonfiction picture book! Brew-Hammond is an American-Ghanaian author/novelist and illustrator Minter is a Caldecott Honoree. It covers the history of the color blue, how it was made over time, and the human labor that has gone into making it. But also how it’s been used in cultures throughout the world! Super neat, love nonfiction for younger people.

Running Sideways: The Olympic Champion Who Made Track and Field History by Pauline Davis, T. R. Todd

Davis grew up running to get water for her family in The Bahamas, going sideways to avoid bullies. She navigated astonishing challenges to compete in five Olympics and win two Olympic gold medals, becoming the first individual gold medalist in sprinting from the Caribbean. She went on to become the first Black woman on the World Athletics council. Did I mention she didn’t win her gold medals until age 34? 34! Amazing.

Greed in the Gilded Age cover

Greed in the Gilded Age: The Brilliant Con of Cassie Chadwick by William Elliott Hazelgrove

Well this looks fun. Chadwick was a late nineteenth century con artist who defrauded banks for literally millions of dollars. This was when women weren’t even allowed to get loans from banks. Because of sexism. She also opened a brothel in Cleveland because sure. Her biggest con was saying she was Andrew Carnegie’s “illegitimate” daughter. She got millions of dollars from banks based on this lie! To learn more including how she got away with this for eight years check this out.

Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Wedded Bliss (?), Hong Kong, and Why the Contessa

HELLO happy February, it’s starting to get lighter out, so that is a joy and a treasure. Lots of good releases this week, so let’s get to it:

Foreverland Cover

Foreverland: On the Divine Tedium of Marriage by Heather Havrilesky

Sure, marriage can be hard, and sometimes boring, but maybe the boring is good? Ask Polly advice columnist Havrilesky writes about the ups and downs of her own fifteen year marriage, illustrating “what a tedious, glorious drag forever can be.” Havrilesky wrote a piece for this book that was in the NYT, and it definitely made me want to pick this up.

The Impossible City cover

The Impossible City: A Hong Kong Memoir by Karen Cheung

Called one of the most anticipated books of 2022 by Entertainment Weekly, this is “a rare insider’s view” of Hong Kong from someone who grew up there. Cheung was born just prior to Hong Kong being “handed over” from the UK to China. She tells of her “yearslong struggle to find reliable mental health care in a city reeling from the traumatic aftermath of recent protests” and delves into its musical and artistic life, sharing what it means to be a part of this complicated city.

Black American Refugee cover

Black American Refugee: Escaping the Narcissism of the American Dream by Tiffanie Drayton

Drayton and her siblings moved to New Jersey in the early 1990s to join her mother. They were coming from Trinidad and Tobago. She soon started asking questions about the racial dynamics of the US — “Why were the Black neighborhoods she lived in crime-ridden, and the multicultural ones safe? Why were there so few Black students in advanced classes at school, if there were any advanced classes at all?” At age twenty, she moved back to Tobago, and absorbs the news from America, particularly concerning Black Americans, with the keen eye of someone outside the maelstrom.

The Color of Abolition cover

The Color of Abolition: How a Printer, a Prophet, and a Contessa Moved a Nation by Linda Hirshman

I love this trend of telling the stories of multiple figures and how their work combined. William Lloyd Garrison and certainly Frederick Douglass are more known, but Maria Weston Chapman, aka “the Contessa,” has not stuck as strongly to the pages of history. These three all worked for abolition from the 1830s to 1860s. If you’re wondering about the Contessa nickname, no worries, I did a deep dive on Google. It looks like she was nicknamed that by American author Edmund Quincy, who liked to dole out nicknames. Anyway! This looks interesting.

Make sure to get your own Read Harder Book Journal from Book Riot to track your reading for the year!


Don’t forget you can get three free audiobooks at Audiobooks.com with a free trial!

For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.